Welding For Fun

Today is the last day of National Welding Month and a great opportunity to reach out to all the MAKERS sprouting up across the country with a word about welding. The global collective interest in learning how to do things for ourselves and to get hands-on in our lives is a great inspiration for learning how to weld. Perhaps the best part of welding for fun is that you’ll actually learn how to do something incredibly useful!
welding-for-fun
A big part of the Maker movement is learning to combine technology with traditional ways of working in metals, fibers and other arts and crafts. At the foundation of making many projects, from robots to furniture are metal structures. Knowing how to weld opens up many new potential project options.
While getting certified for underwater welding might be an expensive proposition, learning welding for fun can be very affordable and accessible. Many private workshops have started opening their doors to students of all ages and abilities. The growing interest has even led companies like TechShop to open facilities across the country that offer maker space and a full range of welding classes.

Where To Learn Welding For Fun

One of our favorite workshops for welding classes in Seattle is All Metal Arts. Students can learn skills from the very basics of welding for fun, to advanced techniques. With small class sizes the instructor is able to customize sessions to students’ skills and interests. There are also a variety of fun project-based classes such as making art objects, Welding for Auto Restoration, and CNC Plasma How-to. Learn more about All Metal Arts current class schedules >
If you’re not in the Seattle area, check into TechShop! This organization has locations across the country and classes are open to non-members. Welding courses cover a variety of techniques. Additional fabrication and technology courses are also offered at TechShop. Learn more about TechShop Classes >
Learn more about the metals you’ll be welding with these handy OnlineMetals Resources:

photo credits: Ben Green (c)